Faculty Development Cohorts Offered at the Faculty Center

The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning offers opportunities for faculty to examine important and new topics in teaching and learning with Faculty Development Cohorts (FDCs). FDCs are occasionally offered at regional campuses.

Faculty participate in multiple workshops, which include a series of hands-on experiences designed to help innovate or refine teaching techniques and learning activities. Participants may receive support from representatives of the Faculty Center, Office of Institutional Research, Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness (RITE), Research and Commercialization, Office of Instructional Resources, Center for Distributed Learning, Libraries, and other relevant units and individual faculty members. After completing the workshops, participants often produce a final project for inclusion in the Faculty Center Web site.

Faculty are requested to share data on the effectiveness of activities and environments on student learning for potential publication. Participants may also use any data collected in their classroom for their own publication. If you have questions, please contact the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning at 407-823-3544 or e-mail fctl@ucf.edu.

Spring 2019 Cohorts

Course Innovation Project: Downtown Active-Learning Spaces

  • Fridays, 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m., 2/22, 3/8, 3/29, 4/19

Faculty moving to the downtown campus, where Active Learning Classrooms (ALCs) are the design of choice, may recognize the opportunities and challenges associated with teaching in them. This Course Innovation Project will address instructional pedagogies, physical environments, assessments, and technologies that are likely to be encountered on the downtown campus ALCs. It is designed specifically for faculty in the College of Community Innovation and Education (CCIE) and the Nicholson School of Communication (NSC) who are expecting to teach on the downtown campus in Fall 2019 and beyond.

To receive the $500 grant, faculty must attend four cohort meetings, develop activities and assessments appropriate for use in an ALC that can be used for their course, and submit a (re)designed lesson plan that could be used in an ALC. The cohort will meet on Fridays, February 22, March 8, and March 29, and April 19 from 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Please register at http://ucf.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5hhTJBXmlAqpekt by February 15th at 5:00 p.m.

Course Innovation Project: Promoting Student Success using Transparent Assignment Design and Evidence-based Learning Strategies

  • Wednesdays, 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m., 1/16, 2/13, 3/20, 4/10

The Faculty Center will host a Course Innovation Project for up to 10 participants who will develop and implement improved course assignments.

According to an AAC&U study, students who receive transparent instruction about their assignments report developing greater academic mastery and more confidence in themselves as learners. Additionally, teachers with a good understanding of how learning works can share that understanding with students in ways that encourage deeper learning.

Faculty members who meet the following criteria will receive a $500 grant:

  • Attend all four meetings
  • Conduct and share research on evidence-based strategies with peers and provide informal feedback on others’ projects
  • Modify or create assignments
  • Deliver revised lesson plans and assignment descriptions with appropriate assessment instruments.

Because Course Innovation Projects function as learning communities, attendance at all sessions is essential. However, in the event that a participant must miss a session, their grant may be prorated and they may continue to participate. Missing two or more sessions will result in forfeiting the grant, but the participant is welcome to continue attending the other sessions.

Course Innovation Project: Teaching in Active-Learning Spaces

  • Tuesdays, 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m., 1/15, 2/12, 3/19, 4/9

Active-learning classrooms (ALCs) are flexible, student-centered spaces that facilitate the use of active-learning strategies. Faculty on the main and downtown campuses moving into these spaces may recognize the opportunities and challenges associated with teaching in ALCs. This flipped-format Course Innovation Project will address challenges through four important instructional practices that will be impacted by moving to an ALC: implementation of active learning pedagogies, management of physical space, methods of assessment, and adoption of instructional technologies. We will address these practices considering the spaces being designed at UCF (e.g., round tables or tablet chairs, high-tech and low-tech). This CIP will be especially relevant for faculty expecting to teach on the downtown campus in Fall 2019.

To receive the $500 grant, faculty must attend four cohort meetings, develop activities and assessments appropriate for use in an ALC that can be used for their course, and submit a (re)designed lesson plan that could be used in an ALC. The cohort will meet on Tuesdays, January 15, February 12, March 19, and April 9 from 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Because Course Innovation Projects function as learning communities, attendance at all sessions is essential. However, in the event that a participant must miss a session, their grant may be prorated and they may continue to participate. Missing two or more sessions will result in forfeiting the grant, but the participant is welcome to continue attending the other sessions.

Course Innovation Project: WAC Methods for Implementing Student Peer Review

  • Wednesdays, 10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m., 1/16, 2/13, 3/20, 4/10

The Faculty Center will host a Course Innovation Project for a small cohort of participants who will develop and implement peer review assignment prompts and/or Webcourses content pages on peer review for at least one class.

Research in Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) has shown that one of the most influential active-learning experiences students can engage in is peer review. Peer review asks students to access their own knowledge and employ that knowledge by critiquing their fellow students’ work. The benefit of peer review is that the practice of providing critique is a learning experience in and of itself and that students receive extra feedback to help them prepare stronger, more effective drafts of scholarly writing. When integrated as a core concept into a course, peer review can be an effective means of bolstering student writing by offering low-stakes learning opportunities. However, what does an effective prompt look like? What are some best practices for preparing for and implementing peer review? This CIP will answer these questions and support faculty as they build or workshop peer-review assignments used in their classes.

Faculty members who meet the following criteria will receive a $500 grant:

  • Attend all four meetings
  • Conduct and share research on peer review with faculty peers and provide informal feedback on others’ projects
  • Develop classroom or online activities and assignments
  • Deliver a revised assignment prompt and/or Webcourses content page with an appropriate assessment instrument that incorporates WAC strategies.

Because Course Innovation Projects function as learning communities, attendance at all sessions is essential. However, in the event that a participant must miss a session, their grant may be prorated and they may continue to participate. Missing two or more sessions will result in forfeiting the grant, but the participant is welcome to continue attending the other sessions.

Faculty Development Cohort: Writing Your Journal Article in 12 Weeks

  • Wednesdays, 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., 1/23, 2/6, 2/20, 3/6, 3/20, 4/3

The purpose of this cohort is to enable faculty to produce an article manuscript for submission to an academic journal. It is designed to help participants to make time for research and writing in the midst of their other various professional and personal obligations. It is also designed to help participants make and meet weekly goals. Faculty writers will work over twelve weeks during the spring term to revise an existing piece of writing (conference paper, chapter, unpublished draft, etc.), to identify publishing venues, and to submit the finished product for publication. The workshops will be held on January 23, February 6, February 20, March 6, March 20, and April 3 from 10:00 – 12:00. Participants should be prepared to attend all six face-to-face meetings, to have regular online “check ins” with the workshop group, and, most importantly, to talk about their work with colleagues. Each participant will receive a copy of the Writing Your Journal Article in 12 Weeks book prior to the beginning of the workshop.

Book Club: The Heart of Higher Education: A Call to Renewal by Parker Palmer

  • Thursdays, 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m., 1/24, 2/7, 2/21, 3/21, 4/4

Parker Palmer’s Heart of Higher Education builds on a simple premise: good teaching cannot be reduced to technique; good teaching comes from the identity and integrity of the teacher. It is about connecting or reconnecting with our passion for our vocation and our students. We will meet five times during the semester on select Thursdays at noon: January 24th, February 7th, February 21st, March 21st, and April 4th.

If you are interested in participating, please send an e-mail to Eric.Main@ucf.edu. Participants will receive a copy of the book.

 

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