GTA Training

Mandatory Associate Training

The Associate Training is mandatory before any graduate student will be permitted to teach as an instructor of record. If you have previously attended the Associate Training, you do not need to attend the Training again.

Topics covered include: Learning Theories, Learner Differences, Course Design, Syllabus and Course Documents, Critical Thinking, Assessment and Grading, Professional Development and Portfolios, Ethics, Atmosphere, Diversity, Effective Lecturing, Leading a Discussion/Lab, Collaborative Learning, PBL, Legal Matters, Academic Freedom and Integrity, Campus Resources.

The Associate Training is held in Classroom Building I, Room 207. The Training is offered before the beginning of each semester. Part of the Training includes an online module. You should be contacted about how and when to do the online module after Graduate Studies receives information that you will be hired as a GTA or a Grader.

Online registration for the Associate Training can be found at the website for the Office of Graduate Studies. Questions should be addressed to gradassistantship@ucf.edu

 

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Amy Donley
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Adele Richardson
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