Winter Faculty Development Conference

2018 Winter Faculty Development Conference

Monday through Wednesday
December 10-12, 2018
8am – 5pm

Participants will be expected to attend the entire conference to receive payment. Those who cannot attend all sessions on all three days are welcome to participate in as much of the conference as they are able but will not be eligible for funding. This includes those who must miss to complete grading duties or other university business.

Online proposals are due November 12 at 5:00 p.m. and can be submitted here.

Click here to view the 2017 Winter Conference Agenda.

The Karen L. Smith Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning will host the 2018 Winter Faculty Development Conference on December 10th–12th. This year’s theme is Transparency and Authenticity in Teaching. All UCF faculty and staff are welcome to attend plenary portions of the event.

Transparent teaching promotes students’ conscious understanding of how they learn. Research from the Transparency in Learning and Learning Project has shown that when students understand the task, its purpose, and the criteria for evaluating their work, they are more motivated. That doesn’t mean we don’t give students challenging work, rather that we help them understand the struggles we design for them. We’re defining authenticity in the specific sense that assessment and learning activities should be fully integrated with student learning objectives, and therefore clearly connected to students’ future use both at the university and in their careers. Just like learning to drive takes more than reading a manual, and drivers’ licenses should be awarded on the basis of more than written tests alone, meeting student learning objectives requires careful consideration of authentic ways to introduce and measure learning. (See more info about transparency and authenticity in teaching.)

Approximately 40 faculty members will be selected to receive funding to participate in all sessions. Each funded faculty member will join a cohort of colleagues from across campus, make a prepared presentation about professional practice related to the theme, attend workshops, and engage in relevant think tank sessions. The event will feature some elements of a typical academic conference and other elements similar to a working retreat. Funded faculty participants are expected to attend all sessions on each of the three days.

Proposal Criteria
Each applicant for funding will submit a proposal of up to 500 words for an individual 8–10-minute informal, discussion-based presentation describing an aspect of an undergraduate course or program that makes our objectives, assessments, assignments, and learning activities either transparent or authentic for students as defined above.

Proposals will be reviewed using the following criteria: 

  • Quality/clarity of presentation description
  • Relevance to the conference theme

New faculty members will be given special consideration.

Deliverables from the conference will include a brief write-up and/or other materials from the individual faculty presentation to be shared as a faculty resource. We particularly encourage articles for publication in Faculty Focus.

Please note:

  • Registration is for individuals only.
  • Selected faculty members who attend all sessions and submit the required deliverables will receive a $500 grant subject to normal withholding tax.
  • Participants will be expected to attend the entire conference to receive payment. Those who cannot attend all sessions on all three days are welcome to participate in as much of the conference as they are able but will not be eligible for funding. This includes those who must miss to complete grading duties or other university business.
  • Proposals are due at 5 p.m. on November 12, 2018.
  • Final decisions on acceptance will be provided to all applicants by November 20, 2018.

Please confirm availability from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on December 10–12 before applying.  

 

Winter Conferences listed by year:
 
2016  2015  2014  2013  2012  2011  2010  2009  2008 
2007  2006  2005  2004  2003  2002  2001  2000  1999 

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Dima Nazzal
College of Engineering and Computer Science Dima Nazzal I believe that to be most effective as an instructor, one must create a welcoming environment that is interactive, collaborative, and promotes problem-solving. The environment should encourage students to present their ideas and opinions while respecting others’ points of view. I like to continuously explor...

Denise Gammonley
College of Health and Public Affairs Denise  Gammonley My teaching is inspired by the work of Paulo Freire. I strive to create a sense of shared community within the classroom by promoting thoughtful dialogue, critical reflection, and acquisition of empirically based knowledge. My teaching goes beyond lessons about intervention strategies, research, and theory to inco...

Peter Jacques
College of Sciences Peter  Jacques My teaching philosophy is simple: cultivate what works for students! Executing this philosophy is decidedly more difficult than just saying it, but my goal is to engage students in the classroom in a way that effectively helps them learn. Long lectures do not appear to be as effective as we used to think (thoug...