External Resources

The National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) offers this summary of a definition of advising:

Academic advising, based in the teaching and learning mission of higher education, is a series of intentional interactions with a curriculum, a pedagogy, and a set of student learning outcomes. Academic advising synthesizes and contextualizes students’ educational experiences within the frameworks of their aspirations, abilities and lives to extend learning beyond campus boundaries and timeframes. ***

*** National Academic Advising Association. (2006). NACADA concept of academic advising. Retrieved 11/2/2009 from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/Concept-Advising.htm

The NACADA Core Values Declaration (2005) lists these values to advising:

1) Advisors are responsible to the individuals they advise.
2) Advisors are responsible for involving others, when appropriate, in the advising process.
3) Advisors are responsible to their institutions.
4) Advisors are responsible to higher education.
5) Advisors are responsible to their educational community.
6) Advisors are responsible for their professional practices and for themselves personally.

View the complete NACADA Core Values Declaration for a fuller discussion of these values. See also the Introduction and Exposition portions of the statement of core values of academic advising from NACADA.

Faculty advisors working with online courses may wish to view the NACADA standards for advising distance learners.

NACADA also offers numerous publications, research, and an annual conference about advising.

Books For Faculty Advisors

  • Academic Advising (Gordon, Habley, Grites, 2008). UCF Library: LB2343 .A29 2008  
  • Faculty Advising Examined (Kramer). Available at the FCTL library for check-out.
 

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