Faculty Center Grants

The Faculty Center hosts several grants related to teaching and learning throughout the academic year. Each of the programs listed below has a homepage with more information and Requests for Proposals (RFPs), if applicable.

Summer Faculty Development Conference

This four-day faculty development conference occurs at the end of Spring term each year. The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, Information Fluency Initiative, Office of Experiential Learning (Internships and Service-Learning), Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and Office of International Studies and Interdisciplinary Initiatives will provide grants for faculty members who are transforming courses or programs by emphasizing assessment of learning outcomes, diversity, GEP unifying theme, information fluency, interdisciplinarity, internships, internationalizing the curriculum, the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), service-learning, undergraduate research or track-specific research, or other appropriate issues.

More information and proposal applications are on the Summer Conference webpage.

Winter Faculty Development Conference

The Faculty Center hosts a three-day faculty development conference at the end of the fall semester each year. The purpose of the conference is to provide an opportunity for faculty (preferably a team of faculty) to focus on a project that will transform a course or program. Themes vary by year, and some years feature multiple themes or tracks. Participants apply to attend via an online Request for Proposals (RFP) process.

The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning provides numerous $500/person grants for faculty members who are transforming courses or programs by integrating the workshop theme. More information and proposal applications are on the Winter Conference webpage.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Susan Quelly
College of Nursing Susan  Quelly There are many people who are experts in their specific profession or discipline. Some of these people impart knowledge and wisdom while facilitating others to critically think, learn, and achieve great intellectual, psychomotor, and/or emotional growth…we call these people “teachers.” It is no different...

Cynthia Hutchinson
College of Education Cynthia      Hutchinson I am a follower of Leo Buscaglia who prefers the term "educator" to "teacher." He explains that "educator" comes from the Latin term, "educare," which means to tend or support the growth of another. That is the role I hope to play in the lives of my students. I am careful to follow A. Bronson Alcott's ...

Scott Bukstein
College of Business Administration Scott  Bukstein My teaching philosophy is centered on challenging undergraduate students intellectually to enable students to develop personally, academically, and professionally. I fully understand that there is a difference between an instructor lecturing and students learning. I view each class period as an interactive bus...