Obtaining Your Class Rosters

Download your class roster from myUCF: log in to the portal, click on "Faculty/Advisor Self Service" near the top left, and click on "Instructors."

Next, select "View My Teaching Schedule." The three-person icon can be clicked to view the roster, and if you wish to download to Excel, that link is near the top-right of the roster. You may have to hold the CTRL button on your keyboard as you click the link to download (if that fails, you might have to configure your browser to allow popups at the my.ucf.edu domain).

If your assigned course is listed with "STAFF" as the instructor rather than your name, you may have to ask someone in your department to print the roster for you. You might also request that someone in your department change the database so that you are listed as the instructor of record, and can get your own roster. It may also be necessary to have Computer Services change your permissions in PeopleSoft to the 'instructor role' - if so, email srsecure@ucf.edu.

Note that myUCF may require you to configure your browser to accept popups and to add my.ucf.edu as a "trusted site."

Note: some instructors set up electronic gradebooks in Excel as soon as they have their rosters. To avoid complications from late adds and drops, we suggest waiting until the second week of class to create an electronic gradebook.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Robert Borgon
College of Medicine Robert    Borgon Teaching is a learning experience, and effectively engaging and transferring knowledge to hundreds of students is a skill that must be developed and improved upon each semester. I believe teaching can be honed through experience, listening to students, learning from colleagues, and developing new ways to connect t...

Peter Jacques
College of Sciences Peter  Jacques My teaching philosophy is simple: cultivate what works for students! Executing this philosophy is decidedly more difficult than just saying it, but my goal is to engage students in the classroom in a way that effectively helps them learn. Long lectures do not appear to be as effective as we used to think (thoug...

Aubrey Jewett
College of Arts and Sciences Aubrey   Jewett Active learning fosters academic success. When students take part in the learning process they learn more and retain more than when operating in the passive mode. Thus whether attending a local council meeting, performing statistical analysis on data to investigate a research question or using t...