Widespread Absences Lesson Plan

Strategies you can use for your classes when large numbers of students are likely
to be absent or even when they are not.

  • Give more and smaller quizzes: missing a quiz does not impact as much content. Make-ups are quicker. Also gives students feedback more often. 
  • Drop the lowest test/assignment grade(s). (See our tutorial on advanced gradebook functions in Excel) .
  • Offer "amnesty" quizzes, tests, or papers later in the semester as replacements for any missed assessments earlier.
  • Record your regular lectures as podcasts and put on your course Web site or the Knight’s E-Mail’s OneDrive.
  • Record alternative lectures "after-the-fact" as podcasts.
  • Optional make-up exams:  Students can request a make-up instead of dropping the lowest grade (must schedule within 24 hours of exam and take it before next class meeting).
  • Provide online testing rather than face to face testing.
  • Be flexible with deadlines:  Each student gets one or more Free Late Assignment passes.
  • Provide lecture notes online via Webcourses, Knight's Email OneDrive, or other external Web site such as a wiki.
  • Use multiple versions of tests with equivalent but different questions.  You could use Question Sets in Webcourses or test banks that come with many textbooks for this.
  • Create online resources (readings, modules, activities) through a Web page or within Webcourses
  • Faculty teaching the same course or in the same department could serve as substitutes for each other in case they become ill.
  • Encourage students to notify faculty if they are ill rather than just not showing up in class.
  • Visit the Faculty Center or email fctl@ucf.edu for more ideas.

Faculty are encouraged to add their suggestions to this list. Do so by emailing fctl@ucf.edu

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Seetha Raghavan
College of Engineering and Computer Science Seetha   Raghavan The ability to encourage the best effort in students to help them achieve their full potential is a characteristic that distinguishes a successful educator. With this goal in mind, I work to incorporate established techniques to educate future engineers. At the same time, I approach challenges associated with the ...

Sandra Wheeler
College of Sciences Sandra Wheeler As an anthropologist and educator, I engage students in the exploration of human difference and understand it as a strength rather than weakness. In the current political climate where human difference is commonly feared and vilified, we need students to think anthropologically and appreciate the complex and diver...

Farrah Cato
College of Arts & Humanities Farrah Cato In 2011, I was asked to work in the CAH Dean's Office as Coordinator of Scheduling and Undergraduate Curriculum. I took the opportunity, but refused to give up teaching. Every time I'm in the classroom or working with students, I engage in an incredibly valuable and rewarding process. I get excited when students ...