Student Learning Outcomes

Why Use Student Learning Outcomes?

  • Clear expectations for students and faculty
  • Common institutional language
  • Context for course design and revision
  • Curriculum Map and Assessment
  • Faculty self-assessment
  • Curricular match with industry standards
  • Accrediting Agency standards

Example: Students will design a plan for an inquiry lesson using the OCPS lesson plan format and meeting at least one of the Sunshine State Standards for secondary science.

SLOs and Assessment

Student Learning Outcomes are:

  • Specific: Students will be able to <action verb> <something>
  • Prescribe artifacts to be analyzed:
    • Measurable characteristics
    • Specified methods of evaluation: exam responses, portfolio section, performance
  • Indicator: Combined data indicating relative degree of achievement.
    Review results of assessments in all/sample of sections of the courses housing the target SLO’s.

Classroom Assessment and Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

For each classroom, Student Learning Outcomes, ask the questions…

  • What teaching and learning methods will be most effective? (Experience and research help us answer this)
    • Classroom Student Learning Outcomes are based on Outcomes selected for the Course. A Course Outcome may be addressed in more than one class session, at varying cognitive levels and through the use of various teaching and learning methods.
    • Example: Students will research and prepare arguments for and against the issue of whether the US should socialize medicine.
  • What formative assessment tools should be used to monitor student progress?
    • Selecting a Classroom Assessment Tool to evaluate progress toward meeting a Class SLO involves consideration of the content, level of competency targeted and the learning activities.
    • What do we do with the results of Classroom Assessment?
      • Based on predetermined criteria, we adjust class content, our teaching methods, prerequisites, or remedial activities as needed to ensure greater effectiveness.

    In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.


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Claudia Schippert
College of Arts and Humanities Claudia  Schippert At the center of my teaching philosophy is my commitment to challenge students to examine “common sense” knowledge and to think creatively from different perspectives in order to grapple with complex negotiations of religious, political, and cultural identities in different times and places. I ask ...

Beatriz Reyes-Foster
College of Sciences Beatriz  Reyes-Foster Making the Normal Strange: Cultivating Critical Thinking President Hitt's goal of offering the best undergraduate education in Florida goes hand in hand with the goal of making UCF more inclusive and diverse; the very foundations of anthropology are premised on inclusivity and diversity. To me, teaching Anthropol...

Jane Compson
College of Arts and Humanities Jane Compson ‘How do we know?’ This is a key question in many philosophical and religious traditions, and is one my students consider in many different contexts. Just as important, though, is the question of the way in which we know things. In our culture, we tend to take it for granted that the rational and the se...