Institutional Effectiveness

Description:

Institutional effectiveness can be viewed as comparing the university to other universities with similar characteristics. The University of Central Florida compares itself to large metropolitan universities. The exact group of comparison universities may vary with the aspects of the institution that are being assessed.

Benchmarking specific aspects of the university environment helps university administration determine areas that can be targeted for improvement. To see more about how UCF conducts benchmarking, click here: https://oeas.ucf.edu/benchmarkingresources.html

Groups such as U.S. News and World Report use benchmarking and other criteria to rank colleges and universities regarding undergraduate education, and targeted disciplines at the graduate level (e.g., Business, Education, and Engineering). One kind of institutional effectiveness may involve comparing ratings on each of these criteria to the ranking of other universities.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Michael Strawser
College of Arts and Humanities Michael   Strawser Three goals that are central to my overall teaching philosophy are energy, respect, and edification. Energy: I believe that a good teacher should be dynamic, enthusiastic, and passionate for the subject, very knowledgeable and competent in communicating his or her knowledge. These are prope...

Peter Larson
College of Arts & Humanities Peter Larson My foundation derives from the liberal arts tradition: knowledge of a specific subject provides the greatest benefit when part of a well-rounded educational experience. Regarding History in general, my emphasis is on learning to think historically: going beyond a simple “what happened?” to question cau...

Adele Richardson
College of Arts and Humanities Adele  Richardson On the first day I stepped into my own Composition classroom, I enthusiastically thought I was going to teach freshmen how to write. By the end of that same day, I came to realize how shortsighted my assumptions were. And so my own education as a teacher really began. Students don't need to be shown how to ...