Classroom Assessment

Classroom assessments are formative in nature and thus are used to make immediate changes to teaching and learning strategies. They can occur at multiple times throughout a class and results can be used to improve course content, methods of teaching, and, ultimately, student learning. This is a just-in-time form of assessment that leads to immediate change if needed.

Examples of Classroom Assessment Tools:
Minute Papers (Angelo & Cross) Case Study Student Presentations
Misconception/Preconception Checks Analyzing Problems Quizzes (graded/ungraded)
Peer Reviews Jigsaw (Aronson) Muddiest Point (Angelo & Cross)
Concept Mapping Role Play Beginners & Enders
Reflective Writings Student-led Discussions Think-Pair-Share Analysis

101 Interactive Techniques

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Tison Pugh
College of Arts & Humanities Tison   Pugh The common feature of all medieval literature, despite differences in authors, cultures, and genres, is that it is very, very old, and for my pedagogy to be effective, I must demonstrate that this old literature is still very much alive. To accomplish this goal, I rely upon pedagogical practices that center on stu...

Sandra Wheeler
College of Sciences Sandra Wheeler As an anthropologist and educator, I engage students in the exploration of human difference and understand it as a strength rather than weakness. In the current political climate where human difference is commonly feared and vilified, we need students to think anthropologically and appreciate the complex and diver...

Farrah Cato
College of Arts & Humanities Farrah Cato In 2011, I was asked to work in the CAH Dean's Office as Coordinator of Scheduling and Undergraduate Curriculum. I took the opportunity, but refused to give up teaching. Every time I'm in the classroom or working with students, I engage in an incredibly valuable and rewarding process. I get excited when students ...