Program Assessment

Description

Program Assessment involves first defining the program’s mission, its distinguishing purpose and commitment to the students and professional community. The program mission must be in accord with the University, College and School’s missions.

Goals for the program are then developed. These overarching aims provide direction for the specific objectives or outcomes of the program.

PROGRAM Objectives or Student Outcomes designate student performance in terms of specific, measurable activities that provide evidence of learning. A program’s student learning outcomes address three primary areas: 1) discipline specific knowledge, skills, attitudes, behaviors, and values; 2) communication; and 3) critical thinking. These outcomes are addressed in various courses and experiential learning opportunities throughout the program.

SMART Guidelines

MATT Guidelines

MATURE Guidelines

Direct Measurement Approaches

Evidence from direct measurements can be examined to determine if program change is warranted. If so, changes are implemented and the assessment cycle continues.

Indirect Measurement Approaches

Much can be learned from compiling information from current and former students and employers. Though this information cannot stand alone as a measure of effectiveness, it provides an additional option in reviewing performance.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

William Russell
College of Education and Human Performance William       Russell I became a teacher because I wanted to have a positive impact on students’ lives. To ensure that I positively impact students, I follow three basic beliefs: I believe students have different learning styles which require various instructional strategies, methods, and techniques. I believe that the in...

Barry Mauer
College of Arts and Sciences Barry   Mauer A university does not just teach salable skills. It should do that, but more importantly it teaches methods that lead to self-knowledge, critical thinking, citizenship--defined in its broadest sense as responsibility for one's locality, state, nation, and globe--and literacy, which is the ability to read and w...

Kristina Tollefson
College of Arts and Sciences Kristina   Tollefson I demonstrate a humanistic approach to teaching by modeling how to be a productive member of a learning community as I teach content, a lifelong aesthetic appreciation of art and theatre, and communication skills. My goal in exhibiting the behavior I ask my students to practice, including enthusiasm for th...