Wikis

From the Hawaiian word for 'quick', Wikis may be summarized as a webpage that any user can update without logging in or needing special server access. If they can browse or surf to the page, then they can update it. The most famous example of a wiki is Wikipedia.org, the online encyclopedia created and updated by users.

Instructional uses for wikis include:

  • group projects
  • group essays
  • individual projects, assembled onto a group webpage
  • role plays
  • simulations, such as a simulated company's website
  • class notes, or summary of the content

Instructors can create a free wiki at multiple sites, but the recommended site is http://www.wikispaces.com. Once registered there, you may 'create a space' by choosing a name, and then let your students know the location of the wiki in the syllabus, or by announcing it in class. If you choose to only let 'members' update the wiki, then you'll have to grant your students membership access, one at a time.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Kristina Tollefson
College of Arts and Sciences Kristina   Tollefson I demonstrate a humanistic approach to teaching by modeling how to be a productive member of a learning community as I teach content, a lifelong aesthetic appreciation of art and theatre, and communication skills. My goal in exhibiting the behavior I ask my students to practice, including enthusiasm for th...

Nancy Brasel
College of Education and Human Performance Nancy  Brasel My students are teacher candidates who will become classroom teachers to countless children after successfully completing this degree.   I keep this challenging perspective in mi...

Judith Ruland
College of Nursing Judith    Ruland My philosophy of teaching is based on a belief that learning needs to be student centered and that students need to be equal partners in the learning process. My role involves using my expertise to put the necessary resources in the hands of the students or more likely to be sure that my students are well equi...