Wikis

From the Hawaiian word for 'quick', Wikis may be summarized as a webpage that any user can update without logging in or needing special server access. If they can browse or surf to the page, then they can update it. The most famous example of a wiki is Wikipedia.org, the online encyclopedia created and updated by users.

Instructional uses for wikis include:

  • group projects
  • group essays
  • individual projects, assembled onto a group webpage
  • role plays
  • simulations, such as a simulated company's website
  • class notes, or summary of the content

Instructors can create a free wiki at multiple sites, but the recommended site is http://www.wikispaces.com. Once registered there, you may 'create a space' by choosing a name, and then let your students know the location of the wiki in the syllabus, or by announcing it in class. If you choose to only let 'members' update the wiki, then you'll have to grant your students membership access, one at a time.

 

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Tison Pugh
College of Arts and Sciences Tison   Pugh The one common feature of all medieval literature, despite differences in authors, cultures, and genres, is that it is very, very old. When beginning my courses, I often face resistant students who have predetermined that, because of its age, the literature under examination is useless, if not altogether d...

Lindee Owens
College of Arts and Humanities Lindee  Owens Over the years, some things about my teaching have not changed. I always work hard to make that introduction to college relevant and rigorous. I badger and affirm students confident enough to question and volunteer, and use collaborative learning when a group’s strength cushions the personal risk that ac...

Peter Larson
College of Arts & Humanities Peter Larson My foundation derives from the liberal arts tradition: knowledge of a specific subject provides the greatest benefit when part of a well-rounded educational experience. Regarding History in general, my emphasis is on learning to think historically: going beyond a simple “what happened?” to question cau...