SMART Guidelines

WRITING STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Specific The outcomes are distinctive to the unit they are assessing. A student outcome specifies what the student will do, obtain, understand, etc.
Measureable Objectives associated with the outcome should be stated in measurable terms. This means that it is feasible to collect accurate and reliable data.
Aggressive but Attainable Outcome should include reasonable stretch targets. (Where would you like the unit to be?).
Results-Oriented A student outcome should focus on student behaviors or responses, not on teaching or academic processes. Other outcomes may focus on program improvement.
Timely The outcome should indicate the time frame for achievement of the outcome (e.g., by graduation, at the end of the first year of the program).

MATT Guidelines

MATURE Guidelines

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Joanna Mishtal
College of Sciences Joanna       Mishtal Having grown up in communist Poland, my memories of school days include intimidating oral exams in front of the class, punitive pop quizzes, severe discipline, and a symbolic barrier between student and teacher. After more than 20 years in the United States, these memories remind me of the kind of teacher I do n...

Taylar Wenzel
College of Education & Human Performance Taylar Wenzel Creating the most impactful learning experiences for my students is my primary responsibility and has long been my goal. I bring my experience, research, knowledge from the field, and passion to each and every class meeting and course experience. As educators, we talk a lot about best practice in our field. In the...

Kathie Holland
College of Business Administration Kathie  Holland “Teach on, Kathie Holland! Teach on!” A student wrote this on a Student Perception of Instruction form, and it still echoes in my mind. There are six principles that provide the foundation of my teaching philosophy: Fan the Passion to Incite Action, Create Structure, Build Relationships, Model the Role...